Welcome back Lounger,
Enter your login details below
      Lost your Password?
Become a Lounger.
It's free. It's easy. It's a community. Get involved!

Fill out your details for instant activation as a Lifelounge community member

This gives you access to post in all forums, comment throught the entire site, get all Lifelounge Newsletters and all the updates on our unique promotions, events and initiatives.

Step 1 of 2
Username:
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email:


  Search

Interview with Flying Lotus

14 DEC 2012 | Posted By: SineadStubbins

0
Interview with Flying Lotus

Flying Lotus
 
Flying Lotus
 
Flying Lotus
 
Flying Lotus
 
Flying Lotus
 
Flying Lotus
 
Flying Lotus
 
Flying Lotus
 
Flying Lotus
 
Flying Lotus
Come the first of January 2013 there’ll be a huge puddle of melted faces in Werribee Park, the home of the inaugural Let Them Eat Cake festival. We reckon this will happen a short time after Flying Lotus takes to the stage with a live performance of his sixth album Until the Quite Comes. That’s the effect his music is rumoured to have on people, and it’s quite similar to the state I was in when I was asked to chat with him last week. I spoke with FlyLo from his home about his surprising love for playing live, his hatred for germ-ridden old ladies on planes and living in the most boring part of LA.

Tim O’Shea: Thanks for speaking to me today man.
Flying Lotus:
Oh my pleasure.

TO: Have you been on the phone all day? I always wonder at what point down the line the person I’m speaking to is, whether they’ve already answered the same questions like a million times.
FL:
I’m just glad you give a shit.

TO: Of course, a lot of people give a shit
FL:
[laughs]

TO: So you’re playing at Let Them Eat Cake on New Years Day.
FL:
Yeeeeahh.

TO: I‘m not sure if you’re aware that it’s a new festival, something which people are pretty excited about because as far as I can see it’s going against the grain of what festivals have become these days.
FL:
It looks amazing.

TO: Was that the reason you signed up? The other acts on the bill are a little more… mature. No that’s the wrong word… I’m trying to say that there isn’t much trash in this lineup.
FL:
Honestly dude, I didn’t know about the lineup when I signed up. I love going out there. Seeing as it’s your summer time and our winter… people are nice and  also I have a new album out, and a new show which I haven’t played in Australia. So Australia being one of my favourite places I felt like I got to bring my new shit, so I’m excited man.

TO: Awesome - are you looking forward to performing? A lot of people seem to be one or the other. They get their joy from producing, and performing is kind of like something they have to do to get their music out there and they more so do it for their fans.
FL:
I love to play, I love to play. I just hate airplanes and hotels and stuff, I love to be at the venue and playing, I love it. But being on planes and going through security and the germs and stuff. When I’m on tour I just can’t feel good.

TO: When you’re playing how much creative licence do you give yourself to mess with your production? Is that part of the fun?
FL:
Absolutely… [wuh wuh wuh wuh wuh wuhw wuwhwuuh huw whuuuh wuh]

TO: Sorry man, you’re starting to break up… I…. can’t…
FL:
Ohhh, can you hear me okay?

TO: Yeah, that’s a bit better.
FL:
I was saying that some nights are better than others, you know I think there’s something awesome about the fact that it can go wrong. It can all fall down and go to shit if I don’t do a good job. I like the challenge, it’s almost like… honestly, its like playing the most important, interactive video game ever [laughs]. It’s like, how to enrich peoples lives for one moment, for one night. It’s how to make people feel okay for just one hour, it’s fun man, I feel the weight of the world lift every time I play.

TO: Did you expect that when you first got into the whole Flying Lotus project? Is that something you expected to enjoy, or is that something you had experienced before?
FL:
No, I never really thought about the live thing man, I never did. I was always just interested in being a producer and I never really… there wasn’t a scene for what I was doing. When I first started we kind of made the scene for us to do this. So I didn’t really see it as a possibility. I thought I’d be playing in a bar with a few people who’d showed up. It surprised me.

TO: Speaking of the whole kind of scene thing, I heard an interview you did and you were talking about where you lived. You were talking about the Valley (in LA) and the fact that it’s not the most creative environment, not the way people talk about Berlin. However I’ve spoken to people who lived in specific musical places yet they were doing something completely different to everyone around them. They just kind of existed on the internet.
FL:
Yeah that’s funny, ‘cause as much as I hated the Valley, I feel like more drawn to go back. Just because it’s a place where I won’t be distracted. I feel like nothing is happening there [laughs]. Really nothing, really nothing. I couldn’t go to a show on a whim, I couldn’t have the homies over on a whim. If you go to the Valley or do anything in the Valley it takes planning and time. I remember being out there and being more productive than the rest of my entire life, you know? But now I’m in the heart of all the happenings in LA, at any given moment I can get a call from someone in the neighbourhood and I stop what I’m doing for a few minutes and have a chat, then listen to music and smoke weed or whatever. It’s like that shit takes up all my time, you know? Like two phone calls, two people come visit and then it’s like the sun’s going down, I haven’t done anything but check emails. I feel like I have to go somewhere no one can find me.

TO: If you’re in a distraction-free environment, where do you get your inspiration from?
FL:
My inspiration comes from just living, being a human being. All the human shit I go through, that’s inspiring. It’s the shit that we deal with as mortal beings that’s inspiring.

TO: Do you try to avoid musical influences? Because it’s hard to really pin down one solid musical influence with your music.
FL:
Nah nah, admittedly I don’t listen to some people because they’re too dope. I don’t want to take on characteristics of people like that. I’ll listen, but I don’t try and fucking analyse too much with stuff that I really, really feel. Its easy to try and emulate people, there’s times where you take it in, and then there’s times when you, like, have to shut out and only listen to the stuff you’re producing. There’s waves of it where I listen to the shit I’m working on and that’s it. I can’t allow the outside influence to get in. At this point though I feel like a sponge, I’ll listen to anything that sounds good. I’ve just released two records so I’m just trying to listen to stuff and soak it up - that’s still work in a way.

TO: Working with people like Erykah Badu and Thom Yorke must be pretty great in terms of inspiration?
FL:
Yeah definitely, it’s incredible to be able to ask these great people about their process, it’s really inspiring. But the names aren’t important, it’s the work. I don’t care if it’s a fucking kid I just met or a legendary artist, the work is what’s important, the sound is what’s important. The name is whatever, I can make someone down the street sound fucking dope if they got some shit, I don’t care. I’d rather fucking help someone create their own legacy than try to be part of someone else’s shit. You know?

TO: Yeah, fair enough. So you actually come from a pretty famous musical family. The Coltranes are a pretty big name in the jazz world. Is there any rivalry there? I remember seeing an interview with you and you were talking about how great it was that your cousin (Ravi Coltrane) could come along and watch your show and be on the other side.
FL:
There ain’t no rivalry there man, it’s my cousin. He was sneaking me into jazz clubs when I was a teenager. And I always looked at him and I was like ‘man I’ll never be able to contribute anything to this conversation.’ I grew up thinking that shit. There ain’t no rivalry, sorry man you don’t want to fuck with me [laughs]. He’s fucking nominated for a Grammy right now, I ain’t nominated for shit [laughs].

TO: It must be nice to share what you’re doing now with your cousin.
FL:
Honestly it is, that’s the coolest thing. To meet up with my cousin in another country and talk about the game and be like ‘this is crazy, touring all the time’. It’s like someone in my family gets it… you know, I’ve always kind of looked up to him as a big brother and it’s really nice that we’re at a place where we can collaborate.  There’s a mutual understanding and respect.

TO: Hey before we have to wrap it up I just wanted to know what you thought about people describing you as a laptop musician. A lot of people would be offended by that term. Is that an inaccurate term?
FL:
The laptop is the single greatest instrument ever! I don’t even rock a laptop in the studio anymore. I’m on a desktop [laughs].

TO: So it doesn’t bother you?
FL:
No, I don’t fucking care. People can say what ever they want man, they will.

TO: How would you describe yourself?
FL:
…A lazy one.

TO: A lazy one? In what way.
FL:
I’m just kidding, obviously not. I don’t fit around trying to describe myself. If someone wants to call me a laptop musician, I don’t give a shit. I have to deal with that shit all the time on airplanes, when an old lady asks me what I do for a living. No one other than interviewers wants to hear about this shit.

TO: Okay man I’m sorry, that may not have been the best question to finish on.
FL:
[laughs]

TO: This is kind of on the same line of questioning, but I saw an online forum on the Abelton Live (music production software) website and people were talking about how you make your beats.
FL:
Really?

TO: Yeah, they were talking about stuff like sidechaining the whole drum kit and putting swing on everything - is there one tool or effect that defines your sound?
FL:
When I find a way of working that I like I exhaust it, then I won’t do it anymore. I’ll make a whole bunch of tracks with a certain kind of approach, then I go away and I come back and I’m like ‘how can change this?’ I want to try something different. With Abelton you can approach it from so many different ways. I can just think about the different ways to play with it and come home and have a totally new approach to sampling, to paying shows, whatever. I’m always learning stuff, still. Part of the fun is like every time I make a new record I have this period of time when I’m just like a sponge and soak up new mixing techniques and learn new software. I don’t know if there is one way yet. There are definitely things I gravitate towards.

TO: I watched something with Fred Falke who said whenever he starts something, he has a completely clean slate - no templates no presets, nothing plugged in.
FL:
That’s the same for me man.  I have everything available, but nothing is set up. But I change a lot between Ableton and Reason, that’s the fun man. Now I might try using Fruityloops on my PC to try it out and see what I can do. I have an MPC too, it’s cool to have these different approaches. Even if I only make one track on the MPC, it’ll be worth it. Which is good I guess.

TO: Well I’d better let you go, we’re really looking forward to seeing you at Let Them Eat Cake and what you’re going to do with the new album.
FL:
Thank you very much.

WORDS: Tim O’Shea

More at everguide.com.
0
RELATED CONTENT
Lifelounge's 2014 Albums of the Year
Drake announces first ever Australian headline shows with special guest 2 Chainz
Tkay Maidza releases free mixtape
Future Music Festival 2015 line-up
D’Angelo announces Soulfest sideshow in Melbourne
Dillon Francis and Brendon Urie release a song together
Sean Paul and Mya touring Australia
Comments on this Post
There are "0" comment(s) on "Interview with Flying Lotus"


Want to talk it out?

If you’re already a Lifelounge member, simply login. Or you can connect via Facebook. If you want to stay anonymous (chicken!) just fill in this form for a once-off comment.

To sign-up to Lifelounge click here.
Your Name:
Your Email:
 


Link Image YouTube



Featured Today on Lifelounge
Sugar Mountain 2015 line-up
Sugar Mountain 2015 line-up

Posted in Music - 2 months ago

We have a Twin Peaks obsession
We have a Twin Peaks obsession

Posted in The Lounge - 2 months ago

Daily Instagram Goodness
Also by SineadStubbins
Wrangler spring summer 2013
Wrangler spring summer 2013

Posted in Fashion - about a year ago

Joephin Ritschel draws good
Joephin Ritschel draws good

Posted in Art and Design - about a year ago

Art by Isabel Martinez
Art by Isabel Martinez

Posted in Photography - about a year ago

Rihanna for River Island fall winter 2013
Rihanna for River Island fall winter 2013

Posted in Fashion - about a year ago

Lafayette fall winter 2013
Lafayette fall winter 2013

Posted in Fashion - about a year ago

4
I have been researching this subject for a few day...

1 link
kelly brook
 
6
I always loved Mr. Magorium's last monologue...

1 video
Castia
 
1
There are millions of people who want to buy Nike ...

1 link
magalitemple_101356
 
 
5
Hello, I'd like to show this band, well, my native...

1 video
Juan Arakak
 
2
It's a shame how far that company has fallen and w...

1 link
arthurhansen
 
4
There are very few designers who offers such vibra...

1 link
emilymcauley
 
5
Hey Glen, Best to contact Luke's reps at the Jacky...
Annabanana
Seen
Lucas Grogan paints and stitches conversations
Lucas Grogan paints and stitches conversations
_0007_08